Featuring Thought Leaders from Industry and Academia

Speaker Bios

Poster Competition for Trainees with Cash Prizes
Abstract Submission Deadline: Sunday, September 15, 2019

Talks Start @ 9:00 AM
Poster Session & Cocktail Reception
@ 4:30 - 6:00 PM

Venue

The Study at University City
Philadelphia Hotel Near Drexel University & UPenn

20 S. 33rd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Conference Co‑Chairs

Kara spiller

Kara Spiller

Drexel University

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Chris rodell

Chris Rodell

Drexel University

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Yinghui zhong

Yinghui Zhong

Drexel University

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Speakers

Michele kutzler

Michele Kutzler

Drexel University

Dr. Kutzler joined Drexel University College of Medicine faculty in 2007, recruited from the University of Pennsylvania where she was a postdoc in the laboratory of David Weiner, the lab considered the founder of the area of DNA vaccines (Kutzler PI NIAID F32 National Research Service Award entitled, “TNT: targeting and triggering mucosal adjuvants for HIV-1 vaccines” F32AI054152). She is the Assistant Dean of Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. Kutzler’s laboratory research aims to develop effective DNA-based vaccines that target a wide range of pathogenic organisms including Influenza virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), as well as the bacterium Clostridium difficile. Research focus ranges from understanding the mechanisms by which long-lasting protective immunity (immune correlates) against pathogenic organisms is acquired, to concepts in the development of next generation DNA-based vaccine platforms, modified antigenic design, novel delivery methods and use of molecular adjuvants to boost host immunity and improved vaccine efficacy. Dr. Kutzler was recognized as one of Drexel’s “REACH: Drexel’s up and coming Next Generation Junior Faculty” and received the faculty Young Scientist Award at Drexel University College of Medicine Discovery Day. Her laboratory has received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Pfizer, Inc., MARS endowment for Aging Research, Pennsylvania Department of Health formula funds (CURE Award), WW Smith Trust Foundation and the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program.

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Kaitlyn sadtler

Kaitlyn Sadtler

Earl Stadtman Investigator,
Chief of the Section for Immune-Engineering,
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering,
National Institutes of Health

Dr. Kaitlyn Sadtler is an Earl Stadtman Tenure-Track Investigator and Chief of the Section for Immuno-Engineering at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health. Previously, she completed her postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Robert Langer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During her time at MIT she was the recipient of multiple awards including a Ruth L. Kirschstein NRSA Postdoctoral Fellowship for her work on immunoengineering in the context of soft tissue trauma, a TED Fellow whose TED talk was listed as one of the top 25 most viewed in 2018 (go.ted.com/kaitlynsadtler), and was recognized on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in Science for 2019, as well as recently being selected as a 2020 TEDMED Research Scholar. Prior to MIT, Dr. Sadtler completed her Ph.D. at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where her work was featured in publications in journals such as Science and Nature Methods among others. Dr. Sadtler received her B.S. summa cum laude from University of Maryland Baltimore County prior to a postbaccalaurate IRTA at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease in the Lab of Cellular and Molecular Immunology.

Dora mitchell

Dora Mitchell

Carisma Therapeutics

Dora heads business development at Carisma Therapeutics having previously served as Vice President of Operations and built the company infrastructure from its inception to a fully operating funded entity. Prior to joining Carisma, she managed the therapeutics and diagnostics company portfolio at PCI Ventures at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn), where she also directed the UPstart Company Incubator. In that role, she led the launch, funding, incubation and growth of Penn intellectual property-based businesses including CytoVas LLC, LignaMed LLC, Quantitative Radiology Solutions LLC, Linnaeus Therapeutics Inc. and others. Prior to joining PCI Ventures, Dora was a member of the Health and Life Sciences team at Battelle Ventures, LP, an early-stage life science and technology company investor.

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Susan thomas

Susan Thomas

Georgia Institute of Technology

Susan Napier Thomas holds a Woodruff Professorship and is an Associate Professor with tenure of Mechanical Engineering in the Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience at the Georgia Institute of Technology where she holds adjunct appointments in Biomedical Engineering and Biological Science and is a member of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Prior to this appointment, she was a Whitaker postdoctoral scholar at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering cum laude from the University of California Los Angeles and her Ph.D. as in Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering as a NSF Graduate Research Fellow from The Johns Hopkins University. For her contributions to the emerging field of immunoengineering, she has been honored with the 2018 Young Investigator Award from the Society for Biomaterials for "outstanding achievements in the field of biomaterials research" and the 2013 Rita Schaffer Young Investigator Award from the Biomedical Engineering Society "in recognition of high level of originality and ingenuity in a scientific work in biomedical engineering." Her interdisciplinary research program is supported by multiple awards from the National Cancer Institute, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Susan G. Komen Foundation, amongst others.

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Cherie stabler

Cherie Stabler

University of Florida

Dr. Cherie Stabler is a tenured Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering at the University of Florida. She also is an Affiliate Member of the UF Diabetes Institute. She received her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from The Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University in 2004 and conducted her postdoctoral work in the Department of Surgery at Emory University (2004-2006), supported by an individual JDRF Postdoctoral fellowship. Prior to moving to UF in 2015, she was an Associate Professor in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Miami, where she also served as the Director of the Tissue Engineering laboratory at the Diabetes Research Institute (2006-2014). Dr. Stabler has established an internationally recognized research and educational program focused on the generation of translational biomaterial platforms for cellular implants, with a particular emphasis on treating Type 1 diabetes. Her novel bioactive materials are targeted at enhancing islet graft survival and utilizing local and translational approaches to dampen host immunological responses. Her work spans from designing new biomaterials to seeking FDA clearance for implanting combinatory products. Her research has resulted publications across a spectrum of journals, from Biomaterials to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science to Advanced Healthcare Materials, and 5 patents, with research funding from NIH (DP2, R01, UC4, SBIR) and numerous nonprofit agencies (e.g. JDRF, Helmsley). She is an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the recipient of the 2008 NIH NIDDK Type 1 Diabetes Pathfinder DP2 Award, and a UF Term Professor (2019-2022). She is a member of the BTSS NIH study section, the ADA Grant Review Committee, the JDRF Encapsulation Consortia, and the NIH Human Islet Research Network (HIRN). In addition to research, she serves as a strong educator, serving as Associate Chair for Graduate Programs and the primary advisor to over 15 doctoral, 15 masters, and 50 undergraduate students. With a focus on improving parity in representation in the sciences, her mentored students exhibit high diversity (58% female and 35% underrepresented minority). She also serves as the co-Director of the NIH T32 entitled “Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Type 1 Diabetes and Biomedical Engineering”. Her mentees have gone on to tenure-track faculty positions at research I universities, managers at R&D divisions of companies, regulatory consultants, and research directors at nonprofit companies.

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Edward botchwey

Edward Botchwey

Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Edward Botchwey is an Associate Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia tech and Emory University. He serves as the director of the Laboratory for Immuno-Regenerative Engineering located in the The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB) in the heart of midtown Atlanta. His group seeks to understand how inflammatory signals can be harnessed to improve tissue repair outcomes. This talk will describe investigations into metabolism and signaling of bioactive sphingolipids such as sphingosine 1-phosphate and pro-resolving lipid mediators for applications in regenerative engineering. Flow Cytometry based Immunophenotyping and pseudotime analysis of tissues treated with bioactive lipids will be used to investigate biphasic adhesion of pro-angiogenic monocyte and neutrophil subsets. Pre-clinical modeling results will show how non-classical monocytes serve as biased progenitors of pro-angiogenic, anti-fibrotic macrophages within excisional skin wounds and volumetric muscle loss injuries. Results will also show how local polarization of recruited monocytes toward tolerogenic immune subsets enhances the survival and engraftment of skin allografts in the absence of systemic immunosuppression.

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Joel collier

Joel Collier

Duke University

Joel H. Collier, PhD is an Associate Professor at Duke University in the Biomedical Engineering Department. His research focuses on designing novel biomolecular materials for applications within immunotherapies, three-dimensional cell culture, and tissue repair. He received his undergraduate degree in Materials Science from Rice University and his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Northwestern University. From 2007 he was a faculty member at the University of Chicago, in the Surgery Department, and he moved to Duke BME in 2016. He currently sits on the editorial boards of Acta Biomaterialia and the ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. He has won awards including an NSF CAREER award and the 2015 Biomaterials Science Lectureship, he was the 2017 Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, and he is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE).

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Jordan green

Jordan Green

Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Jordan J. Green is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery, Oncology, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, and Materials Science & Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is the Director of the Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Program and Founding Associate Director of the Translational Tissue Engineering Center (TTEC) at JHU. Dr. Green received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering and in Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003 and completed his Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007. Subsequently, Dr. Green was a postdoctoral associate at MIT from 2007-2008. Dr. Green was the founding CEO of the Baltimore biotech company AsclepiX Therapeutics and currently serves as a Director. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and an Associate Editor at Science Advances. His work has resulted in the publication of over 100 scientific papers, 30 issued or pending patents, and he has received numerous awards including the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Allan Colburn Award, the Biomedical Engineering Society Rita Schaffer Award, the American Society for Engineering Education Curtis W. McGraw Research Award, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Popular Science’s Brilliant Ten, and is a National Academy of Medicine Emerging Leader in Health & Medicine. Dr. Green and his lab are inventing the future of medicine through innovation of biomaterials, nanotechnology, and advanced therapeutics. Research includes targeted anticancer therapeutics (SKCCC), gene and cell therapies (TTEC), immunotherapies (BKI), and ocular therapies (Wilmer Eye Institute).

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Chris jewell

Chris Jewell

Johns Hopkins University

Christopher M. Jewell is the Minta Martin Professor of Engineering , Associate Professor, and Associate Chair for Research in the Fischell Department of Bioengineering at the University of Maryland. He is also the Director of the University’s BioWorkshop Core Instrument Facility, and a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). Dr. Jewell has authored over 85 manuscripts and patents, including papers in ACS Nano, Cell Reports, Nature Materials, PNAS, and Nature. Some of Dr. Jewell’s honors include being honored by the White House as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), selection as a Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator, appointment as an Associate Scientific Advisor for Science Translational Medicine, receipt of the NSEF Young Investigator Award and Owens Corning Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), and selection as the University of Maryland’s Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year. Chris was also honored as the state of Maryland’s Outstanding Young Engineer by the Maryland Academy of Science, the state’s highest honor for an engineer under 36. Dr. Jewell graduated from Lehigh University in 2003 with high honors, earning dual degrees in Chemical Engineering and Molecular Biology. He received his PhD in 2008 from the University of Wisconsin – Madison, working with Professor David Lynn. Chris then joined the Boston Consulting Group in New York City, where he worked in R&D strategy with global pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Jewell carried out his postdoctoral training as a Ragon Institute Fellow working with Dr. Darrell Irvine at MIT and as a Visiting Scientist at Harvard with Dr. Dan Barouch in the division of Vaccine Research.

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Chris rodell

Chris Rodell

Drexel University

Dr. Christopher B. Rodell is an Assistant Professor in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Health and Science Systems at Drexel University. Chris received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Tulane University as part of the historic ‘Katrina Class’ of 2009. He went on to conduct his doctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania, working on the development and in vivo application of injectable supramolecular hydrogels. Following completion of his PhD, Chris was a postdoctoral scholar with the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, exploring drug delivery platforms for innate immune activation and their applications toward cancer immunotherapy. To date, Chris has authored more than 30 peer-reviewed publications, 3 patent applications, and is the recipient of a number of awards, including an American Heart Association Predoctoral Fellowship, a Materials Research Society Gold Award, and the Solomon R. Pollack Award for excellence in graduate biomedical engineering research from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Jamal lewis

Jamal Lewis

University of California, Davis

Jamal Lewis is an Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Davis. Prior to his professorship, Dr. Lewis was Senior Scientist at OneVax, LLC and a Post Doctoral Associate in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, where he also received a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering in 2012. Dr. Lewis completed his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Florida A&M University in 2004, and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering in 2007 from North Carolina State University. His research, educational and entrepreneurial efforts have been supported by the NIH. His honors and awards include the prestigious NIH Early Stage Investigator MIRA, Regenerative Medicine Workshop Young Faculty Award, and the Society for Biomaterials STAR Award.

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Matthew wolf

Matthew Wolf

Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Matthew Wolf is a Hartwell Fellow and Research Associate in Dr. Jennifer Elisseeff’s lab within the Translational Tissue Engineering Center at Johns Hopkins University and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr. Wolf is translationally focused on implantable biomaterial scaffolds that stimulate immune responses to enhance cancer immunotherapy response rates and tissue healing. In collaboration with industry partners, Dr. Wolf has invented technologies to reduce fibrosis and improve tissue integration of medical devices, and to induce cancer immunotherapy sensitive immune environments leading to 2 accepted patents. Dr. Wolf has expertise in immunomodulatory biomaterials, notably decellularized tissue-derived scaffolds with publications in Science Translational Methods and Nature Methods. Dr. Wolf obtained his B.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh and was previously co-chair of the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM) fellows council. Dr. Wolf was awarded the Hartwell Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship (2016) and was recipient of the Regenerative Medicine Workshop Young Investigator Postdoctoral Award (2019).

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